Latest News

RECORD BREAKING COVERAGE

04-07-2016

We’ve often heard of people insuring body parts that are considered to be exceptional. Some athletes like David Beckham insure their feet, some entertainers insure their voices, others like J’Lo insure… other parts. But now, thanks to the wonderfully weird world that is the Guinness Book of Records there may be a new body part worth insuring.

Johnny Strange, a 26-year-old escapologist and sideshow performer from Blackburn in the UK, has been featured in the 2016 edition of the famed tome for pulling a huge aeroplane with his ears.

Dubbed 'The man with the ears of steel’, this will be the eighth time Johnny’s name has been recorded in the astonishing archive.

The previous record holder of such amazing feats as “Most apples held in the mouth and chainsawed in 30 secs” and “Most animal traps released on the body in 1 min”, Johnny has proudly added “Heaviest vehicle pulled by pierced ears” to his list of achievements.

"Preparing for the plane pull was tough. I'm not going into detail but I have to stretch my ears and create tough scar tissue so they don't rip,” said Strange, tugging at a lobe.

"I am always delighted when I get another Guinness World Record and being featured in the book never gets old for me, the only problem is I'm starting to run out of places to hang up my certificates now.”

"In all my years flying I have seen some extraordinary things but I have never seen an aeroplane moved like that,” said Simon Lowman, of The North Weald Flying Group. "These planes aren't easy to move at the best of times with the engine running. I was fully expecting to have to get the super glue out afterwards to stick his ears back on."

A medical marvel, Johnny is currently in discussions with a number of insurers who specialise in niche coverage.

“It’s important to make sure these babies are covered,” said Strange. “They give me my strength. I’m like Samson and his hair — except it’s my ears.”

For the record, Johnny dragged a Cessna 172-P weighing 677.8kg for 20.4 metres. 

Close